top of page

Is Your Gut Imbalance the Hidden Cause of Your Fatigue, Bloating, Joint Pain, or Anxiety?

Updated: Apr 11

Imagine your digestive tract as a lush, diverse garden where a variety of plants (representing the bacteria in your gut) work together to maintain a healthy, thriving ecosystem. When this delicate balance is disturbed, it can lead to a state of dysbiosis, which can manifest in three main patterns: digestive dysfunction, inflammatory dysbiosis, and insufficiency dysbiosis. Each of these patterns can be quite distinct from one another and each pattern can contribute to unique symptoms or health issues.



gut garden diversity
Your Gut is like a Garden

In digestive dysfunction, it's as if the garden lacks the proper tools and resources to efficiently break down and absorb the nutrients from the soil. This can lead to a range of symptoms, such as bloating, gas, and nutrient deficiencies.


Inflammatory dysbiosis is like having certain plants grow out of control, overshadowing and competing with the other plants for resources. These overgrown plants may even release substances that inhibit the growth of their neighbors, leading to an imbalanced and weedy garden.


Insufficiency dysbiosis, on the other hand, is like having a garden where the soil lacks the necessary nutrients and beneficial microorganisms to support a thriving, diverse ecosystem. The plants in this garden may struggle to grow and produce vibrant flowers or abundant fruits, not because they are inherently weak, but because they don't have access to the full range of resources they need to reach their potential.



In this piece, we will discuss these patterns, the symptoms that are typically associated with them, and the ways in which natural treatments can assist in restoring harmony in your gut


What is gut dysbiosis? (diss-bye-OH-sis)


In the human digestive tract context, the term "gut dysbiosis" refers to an imbalance in the bacteria that live there. Within a gut that is in good health, these microbes coexist in a state of symbiosis, functioning together to support digestion, immunological function, and overall health. The disruption of this equilibrium, on the other hand, can result in various potential health problems.


Digestive Dysfunction Dysbiosis

Inflammatory Dysbiosis


 

Digestive Dysfunction


When there is an insufficient amount of digestive enzymes or hydrochloric acid (HCl) in the stomach, a pattern known as dysbiosis takes place. This pattern makes it possible for bacteria to overgrow.


The following are examples of common symptoms:

  • Bloating and gas

  • Acid reflux

  • Indigestion

  • The inability to absorb nutrients; allergies to certain foods

  • Fatigue after meals

  • The feeling of uncomfortable fullness after meals


On a stool test, to determine a pattern of digestive dysfunction we are looking at markers such as:

  • Steatocrit (fat in stool)

  • Elastase (pancreatic enzymes)

  • Certain overgrowth bacteria (bacteria that survived when they shouldn't have due to stomach pH that wasn't acidic enough)


Natural remedies for digestive dysfunction and dysbiosis may include the use of digestive enzymes and hydrochloric acid as supplements, as well as the consumption of foods and herbs that are beneficial to the gut, such as ginger, fennel, and licorice root.


By addressing digestive dysfunction, you can lay the foundation for a healthier gut and potentially prevent or alleviate more complex imbalances, such as inflammatory and insufficiency dysbiosis patterns – keep reading to discover the intricate connections within your gut and how targeted approaches can help you achieve optimal well-being.


Inflammatory Dysbiosis


Inflammatory dysbiosis is a condition that arises when particular microorganisms in the stomach cause the body to react with inflammation.


The following are examples of common symptoms:

  • Inflammation that is persistent

  • Aching and stiffness in the joints

  • Dermatological conditions such as psoriasis and eczema

  • Insomnia

  • Mood swings

  • Weight loss resistance

  • Headaches & Migraines


On a stool test, to determine a pattern of inflammatory dysbiosis we are looking at markers such as:

  • Candida overgrowth

  • Parasite/ Protozoa presence

  • H. Pylori overgrowth

  • Certain pathogenic and even commensal bacterial overgrowth

  • Elevated Secretory IgA

  • Elevated Beta Glucuronidase

  • Elevated Calprotectin

Inflammatory dysbiosis can be addressed with natural strategies that center on lowering inflammation.


Recommendations often include following an anti-inflammatory diet, consuming omega-3 fatty acids, and using herbs such as turmeric and boswellia. L-glutamine, colostrum, collagen, prebiotics, marshmallow root, DGL, cabbage juice & chlorophyll are some examples of nutrients that can be advantageous in the process of soothing & repairing the lining of the digestive tract.



Insufficiency Dysbiosis


Imagine a garden where the soil lacks the necessary nutrients and beneficial microorganisms to support a thriving, diverse ecosystem. The plants in this garden may struggle to grow and produce vibrant flowers or abundant fruits, not because they are inherently weak, but because they don't have access to the full range of resources they need to reach their potential. Similarly, in insufficiency dysbiosis, the gut environment lacks the optimal balance of beneficial bacteria and nutrients, which can limit the body's ability to maintain optimal health and manifest in various symptoms.


When there are not enough helpful microorganisms in the gut, a condition known as insufficiency dysbiosis can occur. This condition results in a diminished capacity to absorb nutrients and promote general health.


The following are examples of common symptoms:

  • Deficiencies in nutrients

  • Alterations in mood

  • Weakened immunological function

  • Chronic fatigue

  • "Leaky Gut" (permeability in the gut lining that contributes to inflammation, food sensitivities and immune dysregulation)


On a stool test, to determine a pattern of insufficiency dysbiosis we are looking at markers such as:

  • Low Commensal Bacteria

  • Low Secretory IgA

  • Often with a predominant insufficiency pattern, I will notice falsely low markers in other areas.



Insufficiency dysbiosis is typically addressed with natural methods that entail restocking the gut with beneficial microorganisms. This can be accomplished by consuming probiotic-rich foods such as kefir, sauerkraut, and kimchi, as well as taking probiotic supplements. Additionally, prebiotic fibers, which may be found in foods such as garlic, onions, and asparagus, can nourish and strengthen the growth of good bacteria in the gut. There are wonderful prebiotic enterocyte nourishing supplements that can come in handy too. Additionally, we aim to investigate how diet and lifestyle choices may be leading to the reduction of microbial diversity.



Stool Testing
A Diverse Community of Microbes with Healthy Relationships is Fundamental to Your Health

By determining the precise pattern(s) of dysbiosis that a client is experiencing, we are able to build individualized natural protocols that will promote gut health and overall well-being. This is the power of natural protocols. Modifications to one's lifestyle, customized supplements, and dietary adjustments may be included in these protocols to alleviate stress and facilitate the healing process. When we collaborate with the natural processes of the body, we can assist in re-establishing equilibrium and fostering a state of symbiosis in the digestive tract.


Digestion dysfunction, inflammatory dysbiosis, and insufficiency dysbiosis are the three primary patterns that can be seen in the manifestation of gut dysbiosis. Each of these types presents its own unique set of symptoms and difficulties. When we have a thorough grasp of these patterns and make use of natural protocols, we can assist our clients in achieving a state of symbiosis, which is characterized by the harmonious collaboration of their gut microorganisms to promote maximum health. If you are experiencing difficulties that are associated with your digestive tract, you should think about working with a practitioner of functional medicine who can assist you in achieving balance and well-being.



Want to join the VIP waitlist for the coming Good Gut Good Life program?




60 views1 comment

1 Comment


Thank you for this inspiring article, Kelly. I've followed your protocol pretty closely, as the rewards have been too great to stray from it. Precise in our discovery sessions! I have felt better than ever!

Like
bottom of page